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You can either read something many times in order to be assured that you got it all, or else you can define your purpose and use techniques which will assure that you have met it and gotten what you need

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My little circle of friends know how twisted my brain is. I’m constantly reading and people always think, ‘Ah, we didn’t know that about you,’ but that’s part of my charm.

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It should be possible to exist with only a short shelf of books, to read and give away. After all – we may not open a book, once read, for ten years or more. But the act of reading has made it part of us – to relinquish it would be to lose an extension of our being.

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Cornelius Cardew’s folk songs were very, very literal, and they were just about workers smashing their chains. It was like reading Das Kapital over a folk-song melody, and it’s a spectacular failure, in my opinion.

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It’s Nathaniel Hawthorne Month in English. Poor Nathaniel. Does he know what they’ve done to him? We’re reading The Scarlet Letter one sentence at a time, tearing it up and chewing on its bones. It’s all about SYMBOLISM, says Hairwoman. Every word chosen by Nathaniel, every comma, every paragraph break — these were all done on purpose. To get a decent grade in her class, we have to figure out what he was really trying to say. Why couldn’t he just say what he meant? Would they pin scarlet letters on his chest? B for blunt, S for straightforward?

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One of the things that was really influential early on was Ezra Pound’s Cantos, one poem he worked on for 50 years. It’s epic. I had a great deal of difficulty understanding it. One of the problems was you’d be reading along in English and he would move to a Chinese ideogram or French-he actually used seven different languages in a given poem. And for somebody who’s not fluent in different languages it has the impact of rupturing your way of understanding something.

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There was a f**king review in f**king Melody Maker [of the first BOSSANOVA single, ‘Velouria’] – ‘Sounds like someone’s been taking singing lessons’. Like, motherf**king A! I am the singer. Who do sing SONGS. It’s like I never sang before; like I was – I don’t know – reading PROSE on my previous records and now I sing. EXCUUUUUUSE me for singing

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Teaching literature is teaching how to read. How to notice things in a text that a speed-reading culture is trained to disregard, overcome, edit out, or explain away; how to read what the language is doing, not guess what the author was thinking; how to take evidence from a page, not seek a reality to substitute for it.

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Drs. Margolis and Fisher have done a great service to education, computer science, and the culture at large. Unlocking the Clubhouse should be required reading for anyone and everyone who is concerned about the decreasing rate of women studying computer science.

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Children start off reading in books about lions and giraffes and so on, but they also-if theyre lucky enough and have reasonable privileges of any human being-are able to go into a garden and turn over stone and see a worm and see a slug and see an ant.

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The Book of the Heart provides a fresh perspective on the influence of the book as artifact on our language and culture. Reading this book broadens our appreciation of the relationship between things and ideas.

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My creative process involves reading books and magazines, writing outside, and moving around a lot. I like to pace around when I’m writing songs.

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One should learn from a book. Books have a lot to teach us. They have a lot of empathy to impart to us, but they should also be fun. This stuff is fun! You shouldn’t pick up a book and say, "Oh my god, I’m gonna better myself by reading this." You may better yourself by reading this, but who cares? Just have fun.

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In the first few pages, Kundera discusses several abstract historical figures: Robespierre, Nietzsche, Hitler. For Eunice’s sake, I wanted him to get to the plot, to introduce actual "living" characters – I recalled this was a love story – and to leave the world of ideas behind. Here we were, two people lying in bed, Eunice’s worried head propped on my collarbone, and I wanted us to feel something in common. I wanted this complex language, this surge of intellect, to be processed into love. Isn’t that how they used to do it a century ago, people reading poetry to one another?

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Reading is difficult. People just aren’t meant to read anymore. We’re in a post-literate age. You know, a visual age. How many years after the fall of Rome did it take for a Dante to appear? Many, many years.

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Also, I’ve spent an entire week without reading any books or talking about them too loudly. I’m learning to work my apparat’s screen, the colourful pulsating mosaic of it, the fact that it knows every last stinking detail about the world, whereas my books only know the minds of their authors.

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I appreciate your giving my book — and in no small way, me — a chance. To thank you, I really wanted to acknowledge all of you in the book. Unfortunately, I didn’t have enough room for each name. So I’ve put in a code name that stands for all of you reading this book. The name is ‘Mom.’ It will be our little secret. So when you see ‘Mom’ in the acknowledgments, you’ll know I’m really talking about you. And don’t let my mother try to tell you otherwise.

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It was a show where you were given a quote out of current events and you had to identify who said it. I was reading eight newspapers a day and had compiled a file of about 300 quotes. I really had to do my research. The White House press didn’t have to bone up on any of it.

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I’m not that into reading. If I’m gonna read, I’m gonna read some cool sci-fi book or something, not some stupid self-help book.