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Most of my ukulele heroes were traditional players from Hawaii, like Eddie Kamae and Ohta-san. There may not be uke stars in popular culture, but there are certainly pop stars that play uke – George Harrison, Eddie Vedder, Taylor Swift, Train, and Paul McCartney.

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I didn’t know I was depressed until years later. Actually, I went to the Minirth-Meier Clinic for ADD. I got tested for ADD. So, that’s nice. It’s nice to know you got ADD. So, that puts you on medication. Did that for years. Then got tested for clinical depression. So, finally when they tell you this, you go, ‘ahhh, this is great.’ So, now this explains events in your life and how you handle them. But our society frowns on it and they don’t want their heroes to have these issues, but unfortunately I do.

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The contemporary hero, the mythical pattern in the imitation of whom we would live, remains as yet undefined. We have no hero; what is more to the point, we suspect hero worship.

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I come from an art history background. I studied at a master’s degree level; I chose to dork out on art for much of my adult life. A lot of my heroes are artists and a lot of my musical heroes have an artistic side.

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Black History Month is dedicated to heroes that paved the way for Black people. It’s a month that’s very imperative because it gives those who lack the knowledge of our heroes a chance to gain insight. It’s not just about the month, it’s about the years that it took for us to get to this one month and it’s beyond placing a value on how much Black History Month really means to me.

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I see the angel Moroni, standing atop the temple, as a shining symbol of [our] faith. I love Moroni, because in a degenerate society, he remained pure and true. He is my hero. He stood alone. I feel somehow he stands atop the temple today, beckoning us to have courage, to remember who we are and to be worthy to enter the holy temple, to ‘arise and shine forth,’ to stand above the worldly clamor and to, as Isaiah prophesied, ‘Come to the mountain of the Lord’-the holy temple.

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Real heroes are others, those who have suffered in their soul, in their heart, in their spirit, in their mind, for their loved ones. Those are the real heroes. Im just a cyclist.

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Retirement isn’t so bad. Give me a tall drink, a plush sofa and a rerun of ‘Matlock,’ and you can have the rest. Matlock is my hero. He never loses.

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When my grandfather died, I started adopting some of his accents, to sort of remind myself of him. A homage. He was a war hero, and he was really great with his hands.

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I think everything I do has Howard Roark [hero of The Fountainhead] in it, you know, as much as anything. The person I write for is Howard Roark.

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Sacrifice. I’d never been in a position where I was number one on the call sheet, and everything was in my lap. I worked 16 hour days, and I was just not the lead of any film, it was a film about Jesse Owens, one of the greatest heroes of the 20th century. It was a whole new type of responsibility. It was a big weight, and I wanted to do him justice, especially in reviving him after 80 years.

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John Lewis is such a remarkable human being. Literally, such a beautiful human being. I remember the first time I met him. We were in the middle of a scene and [Selma director] Ava DuVernay calls, "Cut," and then he literally just came in. He just came walking in.I just froze. I can’t explain the feeling. Seeing somebody who was literally a living hero. He was a hero.

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Jesse Owen was bigger than a black hero, he was an American hero. For me, I looked at it from that perspective. Through my research, I obviously learned a lot, much of which made me sad, upset, disappointed and even angry, regarding what Jesse had to go through. Not only was he a black man in America during an age of high racial tension and segregation, but he was also living in the middle of the Great Depression – it was very difficult times for him and his family.

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A cult hero? I don’t think of myself as any kind of hero. I don’t want to say it’s a fairy tale, but two years ago if you would’ve told me I’d be in this position, I wouldn’t believe it hardly.

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…America has enjoyed the doubtful blessing of a single-track mind. We are able to accommodate, at a time, only one national hero; and we demand that that hero shall be uniform and invincible. As a literate people we are preoccupied, neither with the race nor the individual, but with the type. Yesterday, we romanticized the "tough guy;" today, we are romanticizing the underprivileged, tough or tender; tomorrow, we shall begin to romanticize the pure primitive.